The Age of Aquarius; how Hydrogen Engines could Clean our Cars. 

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The Age of Aquarius; how Hydrogen Engines could Clean our Cars. 

The Age of Aquarius; how Hydrogen Engines could Clean our Cars. Source: T20
The Age of Aquarius; how Hydrogen Engines could Clean our Cars. Source: T20

ICEs, or Internal Combustion Engines, have been the backbone of how the modern world powers itself. It’s also been long known that they are also some of the largest contributors to greenhouse gases in our environment. Not only that, but the infrastructure required to keep up with our car obsession is incredibly taxing, more so than the emissions created by the cars themselves. However, companies and nations worldwide are finally starting to heed the call for change. One company out of Israel is addressing this problem with its Aquarius Engine.

Aquarius Engines, an engineering company, has unveiled its single-piston-linear engine, which has just finished testing, proving it is running on 100% hydrogen. No HFCs or gasoline are to be seen here. With its lightweight design and its unique internal-gas-exchange mechanism, it is cheaper to manufacture and cheaper to repair. Where traditional engines are made up of hundreds of parts, this engine has only 20. Where traditional engines can weigh hundreds of pounds, this one only weighs 22. This dramatically reduces the effort required to repair and maintain and increases the range in which these engines can be applied.

With clean energy initiatives being paramount for the betterment of our ecosystems, it’s no wonder that hydrogen is becoming a strong potential contender for how we power our world. But does that power come at a cost, nonetheless? Hydrogen production is a rapidly expanding field with some of the most promising and interesting developments we’ve seen yet. Electrolysis is a method that uses electricity, specifically from other renewable sources such as wind and solar, that splits the water into hydrogen and oxygen. Another in-development technique is called photobiological water splitting, which uses microbes like algae that consume water in sunlight, with the byproduct being hydrogen. However it is done, Hydrogen-powered cars, machines, and systems are incredibly promising and are likely to be in the conversation around clean energy for years to come. 

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