The small machine can produce 50-75 litres a day, and be easily carried on a trolley. A device has been developed by Spanish engineers which condenses air into drinking water. These are helping improve water access to communities in Namibia and Lebanon. A small machine can produce 50-75 litres a day, and be easily carried on a trolley, but bigger versions can produce up to 5,000 litres a day. The 82-year-old engineer, Enrique Veiga, who invented the machine, said "the goal is to help people". A Spanish company has devised a system to extract drinking water from thin air to supply arid regions where people are in desperate need. "The goal is to help people," said Enrique Veiga, the 82-year-old engineer who invented the machine during a harsh drought in southern Spain in the 1990s. "The goal is to get to places like refugee camps that don’t have drinking water." The devices made by his company, Aquaer, are already delivering clean, safe water to communities in Namibia and a Lebanese refugee camp. "In the villages we visited in Namibia, they were astonished, they didn’t understand, asking where the water came from," he said. The machines use electricity to cool […]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.