A blue-and-yellow macaw that zookeepers named Juliet perches on a branch outside the enclosure where captive macaws are kept, at BioParque in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, May 5, 2021. | Photo Credit: Juliet hasn’t coupled, built a nest or had chicks, so at most she’s “still just dating.” A blue-and-yellow macaw that Rio de Janeiro’s zookeepers named Juliet is believed to be the only wild bird of its kind left in the Brazilian city where the birds once flew far and wide. Almost every morning for the last two decades, Juliet has appeared. She swoops onto the zoo enclosure where macaws are kept and, through its fence, engages in grooming behavior that looks like conjugal canoodling. Sometimes she just sits, relishing the presence of others. She is quieter — shier? more coy? — than her squawking chums. Blue-and-yellow macaws live to be about 35 years old and Juliet should have found a lifelong mate years ago, according to Neiva Guedes, president of the Hyacinth Macaw Institute, an environmental group. But Juliet hasn’t coupled, built a nest or had chicks, so at most she’s “still just dating.” “They’re social birds, and that means they don’t like to live alone, […]

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