Extinct in its habitat for at least three decades, the Alagoas curassow ( Pauxi mitu ) is now back in the jungle and facing a test of survival, thanks to the joint efforts of more than a dozen institutions to pull this pheasant-like bird back from the brink. Three pairs of curassows were reintroduced a month and a half ago in a 980-hectare (2,400-acre) area of the Atlantic Forest in the Brazilian state of Alagoas. Researchers are keeping tabs on them remotely, via GPS tags, to see whether they can find food and shelter, reproduce, and stay safe from predators on their own. The bird is the first case of the reintroduction of an animal declared extinct in the wild in Latin America, and one of just a handful in the world. According to Luís Fábio Silveira, curator of the ornithological collection at the Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo, there are "very few similar cases" in the world. Success stories include the California condor ( Gymnogyps californianus ), the Hawaiian crow ( Corvus hawaiiensis ), the black-footed ferret or American polecat ( Mustela nigripes ), and the Mauritius kestrel ( Falco punctatus ). The journey […]

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