(Vince Fleming, Unsplash) This article is brought to you thanks to the collaboration of The European Sting with the World Economic Forum . Author: Rosamond Hutt, Senior Writer, Formative Content Allotment gardening is no longer seen as the preserve of retirees. Green-fingered and environmentally-conscious millennials are signing up for a patch of nature where they can grow their own food. One of the countries seeing a new generation wanting to take over plots is Germany, where allotment gardens have been part of urban life since the 19th century. The average age of alllotment gardeners has dropped five years since 2011 . Allotment gardens are known as Kleingarten, small gardens, or Schrebergarten, after the Leipzig physician and professor Daniel Gottlob Moritz Schreber, who encouraged children to play outdoors. They sprang up in German cities during the Industrial Revolution to provide fresh air and food for the urban poor. Image: BBR The Romerstadt allotment garden in Frankfurt. Today there are almost 1 million allotment garden tenants in Germany, with rising demand from millennials, particularly families with children, a recent study found. Cities represent humanity’s greatest achievements – and greatest challenges. From inequality to air pollution, poorly designed cities are feeling the […]

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