1. Spain’s First Offshore Wind Turbine Goes Into Operation
  2. Carbon Engineering concludes USD$68 million private investment round
  3. You can now send Gillette your old razors to have them recycled
  4. Vancouver to pilot Starbucks’ new Greener Cup initiative
  5. Global Food Investors Want To Have It Their Way, So They Told Restaurants To Make Supply Chains Sustainable

 

1) Spain’s First Offshore Wind Turbine Goes Into Operation

 

The 5MW Elisa prototype, Spain’s first offshore wind turbine, has officially been put into operation. According to the Canarian Association for Renewable Energy, the turbine was commissioned yesterday, 17 March, at the Plocan test site. To remind, the installation of the full-scale Elisa prototype was completed at the site offshore Gran Canaria at the beginning of July last year. The self-installing telescopic offshore wind turbine is developed under the EU-funded Elican project carried out by a consortium of Esteyco, Siemens Gamesa, ALE Heavylift, DEWI GmbH, and Plocan. The project’s goal was to assemble the entire system, including the foundation, tower and wind turbine, and its pre-commissioning under controlled conditions at the Arinaga port, and then tow it to the site using conventional tugs. This is said to reduce the risks associated with assembly work at sea and cut installation costs by 30% to 40% compared to existing conventional solutions.

 

Spain’s First Offshore Wind Turbine Goes Into Operation

 

2) Carbon Engineering concludes USD$68 million private investment round

 

This funding is the largest investment made into Direct Air Capture – a climate change mitigation technology that captures carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. Squamish, B.C. (March 21, 2019) – Carbon Engineering Ltd. (CE), a Canadian clean energy company, today announced the completion of an equity financing round of USD$68 million, marking the largest private investment made into a Direct Air Capture (DAC) company to date. With multiple investors now on board, this financing highlights the significant commercial interest in DAC, particularly from the global energy and private investment sectors.

 

Carbon Engineering concludes USD$68 million private investment round and proceeds with commercialization of carbon dioxide removal technology

 

3) You can now send Gillette your old razors to have them recycled

 

 

If you use disposable razors, you might throw out as many as 20 each year. Gillette now wants to keep them out of the trash: In a new program, the company is inviting anyone in the U.S. to send in old razors, blades, and even packaging–from any brand–for recycling. To recycle the razors, people can sign up through Terracycle , a company known for recycling hard-to-recycle materials, and when they have a shipment ready, download a shipping label and send it in so the materials can be sterilized, shredded, and recycled into products like bike racks, park benches, and pet food bowls. The program also offers bins to gyms and other businesses that want to serve as drop-off points in neighborhoods, collecting old razors and packaging until the bins are full and can be returned to Terracycle via UPS (for this option, Gillette covers the cost of shipping).

 

You can now send Gillette your old razors to have them recycled

 

4) Vancouver to pilot Starbucks’ new Greener Cup initiative

 

Single-use, disposable coffee cups are one of the worst things for the environment. Though generally made of paper or cardboard, the insides of the cups are typically lined with plastic polyethylene, a substance that takes hundreds of years to break down. Even then, the substance only turns into microplastics, which end up making their way to our food and water systems, according to Environmental Defence . Some curbside recycling programs accept the cups—provided that they’re empty and rinsed and that the plastic lids are removed (to be placed in their own recycling stream). More often than not, people often end up tossing the cups with the lids still on.

 

Vancouver to pilot Starbucks’ new Greener Cup initiative

 

5) Global Food Investors Want To Have It Their Way, So They Told Restaurants To Make Supply Chains Sustainable

 

What did you think just before you bit into your last juicy burger at your favorite fast food restaurant? Was it the delectable smell of charcoal roasting? The fresh-off-the grill heat? The melange of tastes reminiscent of your childhood leisure? The satisfaction from a tasty meal at a good price? When you were ready to munch on that burger, did you stop to think about the path that it took for it to get from the cow on a green field to your local neighborhood market? Did you consider the various stages along the way that were — or were not — sourced sustainably? Essentially, that’s what the FAIRR Initiative and Ceres did earlier this year. The $6.5 trillion investor coalition challenged the following fast food giants to set tough targets to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and water usage of their meat and dairy…

 

Global Food Investors Want To Have It Their Way, So They Told Restaurants To Make Supply Chains Sustainable

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