1. This new recycling innovation could help fix our broken trash system
  2. As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage
  3. 4 Canadian wolves have been airdropped into a US national park to deal with the growing moose population
  4. Lightning Strike electric motorcycle capable of charging on Level 1, 2 & 3
  5. Could a Nobel Prize for Climate Change Save the Planet?

 

1) This new recycling innovation could help fix our broken trash system

 

If you toss an empty yogurt container in a recycling bin and you live in a city where that type of plastic is recyclable, the container might end up as part of a park bench or flowerpot. Polypropylene, plastic with the No. 5 symbol, is a prime example of “downcycling.” Right now, it ends up as a lower-quality material when it’s recycled, so it can’t be remade into new packaging for food. But a new recycling technology could change that. PureCycle Technologies , a company that is currently building a commercial recycling plant in Lawrence County, Ohio, and just announced a new partnership with Nestlé, uses a new process that turns old polypropylene into a virgin-like material. The standard recycling process grinds up colored plastic to create a dull gray or black material that has few uses, which means that there’s little demand for old toys, packaging, carpets, or other polypropylene products that could be recycled.

 

This new recycling innovation could help fix our broken trash system

 

2) As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage

 

Some wetlands perform better under pressure. A new study revealed that when faced with sea-level rise, coastal wetlands respond by burying even more carbon in their soils. Coastal wetlands , which include marshes, mangroves and seagrasses, already store carbon more efficiently than any other natural ecosystem, including forests. The latest study, published March 7 in the journal Nature , looked at how coastal wetlands worldwide react to rising seas and discovered they can rise to the occasion, offering additional protection against climate change . “Scientists know a fair amount about the carbon stored in our local tidal wetlands, but we didn’t have enough data to see global patterns,” said Pat Megonigal, a co-author and soil scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. To get a global picture, scientists from Australia, China, South Africa and the U.S. pooled data from 345 wetland sites on six continents.

 

As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage

3) 4 Canadian wolves have been airdropped into a US national park to deal with the growing moose population

 

Four gray wolves have been airdropped into Michigan for a very important assignment. The quartet, originally from Canada, has been helicoptered into Isle Royale national park to check island’s moose population, which has exploded in the absence of the canine predator. In the past, the Isle Royale national park was connected to the mainland via an ice bridge for 50 days of the year or more, allowing wolves to come and go more or less as they pleased. Now, thanks in large part to climate change, that ice bridge has become less dependable, effectively leaving any individuals on the island stranded. The result: the park’s wolf population has dwindled. Four gray wolves ( Canis lupus ) have been airdropped into Michigan for a very important assignment. The quartet, originally from Canada, has been helicoptered into Isle Royale national park to check the 2,300-square-kilometer island’s moose population, which has exploded in the absence of the canine predator.

 

4 Canadian wolves have been airdropped into a US national park to deal with the growing moose population

 

4) Lightning Strike electric motorcycle capable of charging on Level 1, 2 & 3

 

Lightning Motorcycles still hasn’t entirely dropped the veil on their upcoming 150 mph (241 km/h) Strike electric motorcycle. But they have shared a number of details, with the latest being the multitude of fast and slow charging options. With all of the new electric motorcycles being debuted this year, you might have forgotten about the yet-to-be-released Strike. We’ve already seen Harley-Davidson’s LiveWire and Zero’s new SR/F . But when it comes to the upcoming Lightning Strike , we don’t have many details. So far we know that it is rated for a speed and range of 150 mph and 150 miles (241 km/h and 241 km), offers DC fast charging and that it should start at just $12,998.

 

Lightning Strike electric motorcycle capable of charging on Level 1, 2 & 3

 

5) Could a Nobel Prize for Climate Change Save the Planet?

 

When Swedish chemist and inventor of dynamite Alfred Nobel died in 1896, he left his considerable fortune to fund annual prizes given to individuals who had conferred “the greatest benefits” to humanity during the previous year. But his vision only included five fields deemed worthy of recognition at the time: chemistry, physics, physiology or medicine, literature and peace. Later, Sweden’s central bank also created a sixth prize in economics in his memory. Nobel wasn’t prescient. He couldn’t have foreseen the that climate change would become the defining crisis of future generations, one that would call on the courage, insight and ingenuity of our most brilliant scientists, inventors, advocates and political leaders. Helene and Raoul Costa, a French couple now living in Seattle, want to recognize achievements in climate change — and they think Alfred Nobel would have approved.

Could a Nobel Prize for Climate Change Save the Planet?

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