1. 12 ways the tech sector can help save the climate in 12 years
  2. Your Questions About Plastic Waste, Answered
  3. This new water company’s biodegradable bottle melts away if it ends up in the ocean
  4. Most millennials would take a pay cut to work at a environmentally responsible company
  5. Look inside the underground farm just 100ft beneath your feet in Clapham

 

1) 12 ways the tech sector can help save the climate in 12 years

 

Through e-commerce, search and social media, tech giants influence the decisions of billions of Earth’s consumers and voters every day. This could drive up emissions and spin back the climate clock 50 million years to a Hothouse Earth. Alternatively, as recent research has shown, it could drive extremely low energy demand and help nudge Earth onto a long-term sustainable pathway.

We have just published a report showing 12 ways that existing digital technology – search, e-commerce and social media – can help the world halve emissions in 12 years, based on our Exponential Climate Action Roadmap report launched at the recent Global Climate Action Summit.

 

12 ways the tech sector can help save the climate in 12 years

 

2) Your Questions About Plastic Waste, Answered

 

In January, we published a special report called ” A New Weapon In The War Against Plastic Waste .” It profiled Froilan Grate, a Filipino environmental activist, and his efforts to fight the non-recyclable plastic waste that is clogging miles and miles of coastline in the Philippines. Grate argues that the corporations that produce the waste should be responsible for cleaning it up. And one way he’s getting the brands’ attention is by naming and shaming the companies. We asked readers to share their questions about plastic waste. Nearly 300 questions were submitted, on topics ranging from microplastics in the ocean to how to help the activist in the story. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions.

 

Your Questions About Plastic Waste, Answered

 

3) This new water company’s biodegradable bottle melts away if it ends up in the ocean

 

“It just became very clear that the reason we have a problem with plastic pollution is convenience, and trying to change that delivery mechanism is going to be very difficult,”says Alex Totterman, founder of new bottled water company Cove . “And we don’t really have time. We’re looking at probably less than 30 years and we’ll have an ocean filled with more plastic than fish. While cleanup efforts are really important, we also just need to stop the amount of plastic going into our environment, especially single-use plastic.” So Cove, which is launching later this month, is packaged in a bottle made from a biopolymer called PHA. If the bottle ends up in a compost bin or landfill–or even the ocean–it will fully biodegrade.

 

This new water company’s biodegradable bottle melts away if it ends up in the ocean

 

4) Most millennials would take a pay cut to work at a environmentally responsible company

 

If you’d be willing to accept a smaller salary to work for a company that’s environmentally responsible, you’re not alone. In a recent survey, nearly half of all respondents and three-quarters of millennial workers said the same thing; more than 10% of workers said they’d be willing to go as far as to take a $5,000-$10,000 pay cut. More than 70% said that they were more likely to choose to work at a company with a strong environmental agenda. Millennials are most likely to have done this; nearly 40% said that they’ve chosen a job in the past because the company performed better on sustainability than the alternative.

 

Most millennials would take a pay cut to work at a environmentally responsible company

 

5) Look inside the underground farm just 100ft beneath your feet in Clapham

 

A farm that has never seen daylight, where men in lab coats tend to hundreds of rows of seedlings fed by a high-tech irrigation system and heated with pink LED lighting inside a controlled bunker under the ground.

It’s the stuff of sci-fi films, but it’s happening right under our noses in South London. Or more accurately, beneath our feet.

Undetected over 100ft below the streets of Clapham, sprouting vegetables and salad leaves are stacked in 7,000 square feet of unused and abandoned tunnels.

 

Look inside the underground farm just 100ft beneath your feet in Clapham – MyLondon

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