1) World’s Largest Offshore Wind Developer to Invest $30 Billion in Green Energy

2) Ask a Scientist: How to Deal with a Climate-Change Skeptic

3) City of Freiburg has a brilliant alternative to disposable coffee cups

4) France Becomes First Country in Europe to Ban All Five Pesticides Killing Bees

5) Inuvik receives $40M for wind turbine project

1) World’s Largest Offshore Wind Developer to Invest $30 Billion in Green Energy
Danish energy company Orsted announced a major investment program positioning it to become one of the “renewable majors” leading a global shift away from planet-warming fuels. Orsted, which built the largest offshore wind farm on Earth, plans to invest $30.26 billion in green energy between 2019 and 2025.
Offshore wind projects will receive the majority of the total investment, while onshore infrastructure will receive the rest. Orsted seeks to bump its share of green energy production to 99 percent by 2025, up from 64 percent in 2017. The company changed its name to Orsted from Dong (Danish Oil and Natural Gas) last year when it shifted from a focus on fossil fuel to renewable energy and began divestment of fossil fuel holdings.

World’s Largest Offshore Wind Developer to Invest $30 Billion in Green Energy

2) Ask a Scientist: How to Deal with a Climate-Change Skeptic

With a somewhat misleading title, this article explains how climate scientists are dealing with science sceptics on a daily basis. The lack of understanding, or basic distrust of science (and in particular climate science), by the layperson is apparent. The anti-science lobby has been hard at work and it is apparent that their message has been heard and is being repeated. When people start talking about the highly paid climate science lobby or political motivation of climate scientists, we all know these are Fox News type sound bites being parroted by the uninformed. The scientists are under-paid, under-valued and are speaking out because they are the ones who truly understand what is at stake and how close we are to irreversible change.

Ask a Scientist: How to Deal with a Climate-Change Skeptic

3) City of Freiburg has a brilliant alternative to disposable coffee cups

Germans, who drink an impressive 300,000 cups of coffee per hour use 2.8 billion coffee cups a year, each of which has a useful life of an average of 13 minutes before being tossed out. This rampant waste has inspired the city of Freiburg, Germany to adopt a new reusable coffee cup model. The Freiburg Cup is a hard plastic to-go cup with a disposable lid that’s provided to businesses by the city. Customers pay a €1 deposit for the cup, which can be returned to any one of 100 stories in the city center. These stores will disinfect and reuse the cups, up to 400 times. Participating stores have an identifying green sticker in the window.

The program has been hugely successful in its first year, especially among students on the university campus. Other cities throughout Germany have expressed interest in replicating the program.

City of Freiburg has a brilliant alternative to disposable coffee cups

4) France Becomes First Country in Europe to Ban All Five Pesticides Killing Bees

France will take a radical step towards protecting its dwindling bee population on Saturday by becoming the first country in Europe to ban all five pesticides researchers believe are killing off the insects. The move to ban the five neonicotinoids has been hailed by beekeepers and environmentalists, but cereal and sugar beet farmers warn it could leave them all but defenceless in protecting valuable crops against other harmful insects. While profitability of a few large agribusinesses may be affected, the trade off must be made. It is estimated that 1 out of every 3 bites of food we consume has been pollinated (or is the result of pollination) by bees.

France Becomes First Country in Europe to Ban All Five Pesticides Killing Bees

5) Inuvik receives $40M for wind turbine project

The Government of the Northwest Territories and federal government of Canada are investing $40 million toward the Inuvik Wind Generation project. The project will include wind turbines, a grid controller and a large battery storage system that will provide energy when the wind slows. Money will also go toward building 5 kilometres of road to get to the wind turbines, and to connect the system to the local electric grid. Due to the fact that almost all of the electrical energy produced in the region is generated from fossil fuel sources, the wind project is expected to not only improve air quality but also reduce energy costs to consumers.

Inuvik receives $40M for wind turbine project

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