1) Uniti’s first vehicle will be electric eco-friendly city car

2) ‘Biggest case on the planet’ pits kids vs. climate change

3) New Zealand Ends New Offshore Oil and Gas Exploration

4) Global Floating Solar Capacity Surpasses 1 Gigawatt

5) Britain Achieves the ‘Unthinkable’ as Renewables Leapfrog Fossil Fuel Capacity

1) Uniti’s first vehicle will be electric eco-friendly city car

Swedish startup Uniti’s first car will be a full electric vehicle that is designed using advanced manufacturing techniques and materials that focus on light weight and sustainability. The automaker predicts that the carbon footprint of their vehicles will be 75% less than traditional vehicles from cradle to grave by using components and materials that may be recycled at end of life. Uniti will offer a line of two, four and five-seater vehicle models and offers two available steering options; one traditional and another central pivot joystick control system, unique to Uniti.

 

Uniti’s first vehicle will be electric eco-friendly city car

 

2) ‘Biggest case on the planet’ pits kids vs. climate change

 

In what might be the opening salvo in a litany of legal actions against governments who have stood idly by while industry continues to pollute the world’s atmosphere, the lawsuit brought against the US federal government during the Obama administration is being watched closely. Similar lawsuits, brought by other lawyers, are playing out in other nations, including Belgium and New Zealand, and have been won in Pakistan, Austria and South Africa. Last year, a Dutch court ordered the government to reduce carbon emissions by a quarter within the next five years.

The plaintiffs, 21 children and teens ranging in age from nine to twenty seeks not to define climate change nor assign blame, but ensure the US federal government is acting in the best interests of the people. These children will have to deal with the fact that their lives will be defined by a rapidly changing climate. They understand change must be made today and there is no time to wait for politicians to do the right thing on their own.

 

‘Biggest case on the planet’ pits kids vs. climate change

 

3) New Zealand Ends New Offshore Oil and Gas Exploration

 

New Zealand parliamentarians voted in favour of a bill to end new offshore oil permits. In keeping with their commitment to the Paris Accord, the government has already pledged to power the country’s grid with 100 percent renewable energy by 2035 and aims to become carbon neutral by 2050. While it is a step in the right direction, the government also understands that the current leases will continue to operate until such time as they expire, allowing a slow and natural transition to a cleaner economy and preserving employment and revenue from the sector for the short term.

 

New Zealand Ends New Offshore Oil and Gas Exploration

 

4) Global Floating Solar Capacity Surpasses 1 Gigawatt

 

Floating solar installation capacity surpasses 1 GigaWatt of production in an effort to utilize large areas like hydro-electric reservoirs. These large areas, already serviced by electrical infrastructure to connect the existing hydro generation to the consumer grid, offer an easy and immediate way to further maximize the power potential. The solar provides large baseload during daylight hours and the hydro provides a battery of sorts to store energy. In some cases, a pumped hydro system would also be utilized. At the end of 2014, total global floating solar capacity had only reached 10 megawatts (MW), but as of September 2018, that figure had increased more than 100-fold to 1.1 GW.

 

Global Floating Solar Capacity Surpasses 1 Gigawatt

 

5) Britain Achieves the ‘Unthinkable’ as Renewables Leapfrog Fossil Fuel Capacity

 

In a move that would have been ‘unthinkable’ only a few years ago, Britain’s renewable energy production leapt past traditional power generation from fossil fuels for the first time in 2018. The total capacity for renewables like wind, solar, biomass and others reached 42% and fossil fuel power weighed in at only 40%.

While the 2 percentage points does not seem significant, the growth numbers are staggering. Over the past five years, the capacity from renewables has tripled while a third of fossil fuel generating capacity in Britain has fallen. There is every indication that this trend will continue to increase as energy companies continue to divest from fossil fuels in a response to litigation and pressure from consumer groups and international agreements.

 

Britain Achieves the ‘Unthinkable’ as Renewables Leapfrog Fossil Fuel Capacity

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