For years, weak law enforcement and low public awareness meant environmentally dangerous practices were commonly employed in countries like Indonesia. But local and national government reforms, combined with customary traditions and ambitious NGO programs, are beginning to address the problem. One village in western Borneo has seen a dramatic recovery in fish stocks after temporary fisheries closures were enacted. SUNGAI NIBUNG, Indonesia — The phone signal comes and goes and the electricity grid has yet to reach this patch of jungle on the west coast of Borneo. The quickest way into the village of Sungai Nibung is by boat through the rivers. ( Sungai means “river” in Indonesian.) You arrive at a small dock put up by fishermen, onto which shrimp catches are pulled from nets and sorted by size. Tauke, a fisherman descended from pioneer Chinese traders, concentrates as he keeps count of the incoming shrimp. “These large ones are Class A,” Tauke tells Mongabay, his eyes fixed on a calculator. “If you want smaller ones we also have them further in.” For years, weak law enforcement and low public awareness meant environmentally dangerous practices were commonly employed in global fisheries. Here in western Borneo, fishermen often bombed, […]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here