At Toyota’s LFA Works plant in Japan, the automaker manufactures 10 Mirai hydrogen fuel cell cars a day. It has plans to ramp up production. It may feel as though the electric car has been crowned the future of transportation. Auto companies have plans to make more electric car models, and sales — still only a tiny fraction of the overall market — are expected to get a boost as more countries pass regulations to reduce carbon emissions. But Japan isn’t sure that the battery-powered electric car is the only future, and it’s betting big on something it says makes more sense in big cities: hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. At the LFA Works factory in the city of Toyota, Aichi prefecture, workers install carbon-fiber hydrogen tanks on Toyota’s new hydrogen powered fuel cell car. It’s called the Mirai, which means "future" in Japanese. A hydrogen fuel cell doesn’t burn anything. It uses a chemical reaction between the hydrogen and the oxygen from the air to produce electricity. Hydrogen fuel cell cars are quiet, like battery electric ones, and they emit only water. At this tiny factory, located inside Toyota’s larger Motomachi plant, only about 10 cars are made each […]

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